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Uganda in new search for refinery investor

Three months after RT Global Resources pulled out of negotiations to construct the oil refinery, government has launched a search for a new investor.

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Energy Minister Irene Muloni

Finally! Oil companies welcome production licenses

The Minister for Energy and Mineral Development, Irene Muloni, yesterday issued 8 production licenses to the Joint Venture oil companies.

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A woman sets up a roadside stall in Kigorobya, Hoima. (Photo: Stephen Wandera)

Hoima farmers rue shrunk market for their produce

Demand for fresh produce from the oil camps dropped to a paltry 2,490 kilograms in 2015, from 73,286 kilograms the previous year.

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Saif

Libyan Sovereign Wealth Fund case offers good lessons for Uganda

While a trendy priority for new oil producers, sovereign wealth funds can easily be manipulated if their internal governance and oversight are not strong enough. 

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A woman 'washes' the powder using water and mercury to extract the gold.

Exploit the full potential of artisanal mining

Artisanal gold mining in Uganda today employs way more than the oil sector will ever employ in its lifetime. The bulk of artisanal mining occurs in gold-rich areas.

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Did you Know?

Publicly listed, IPO

A company is “publicly listed” if its shares are bought and sold publicly on a stock market/stock exchange. It is owned by the shareholders (who may include both individual shareholders and “institutional investors” such as pension funds), and managed by a Board of Directors elected by an Annual General Meeting.  Private businesses, even when they are quite large, can operate lawfully without listing on a stock exchange.  Public listing, however, is a useful way for a growing company to raise capital (at first through an “initial public offering” [IPO] that offers shares in the company for sale, and later through the issue of further shares), and most of the world’s larger companies are publicly listed.  Transparency requirements for publicly listed companies are higher than for wholly private companies, because the publicly listed companies are required by law to disclose financial and other information in reports to shareholders and government authorities.

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