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Civil Society

  • Refinery resettlement study on track, says contractor

    A firm contracted by the government to design a resettlement and compensation package for people displaced by the Hoima oil refinery project expects to conclude its initial study this week, according to the contractor, Strategic Friends International (SFI).

    “We are finishing a field study of the area this week. We shall then embark on writing up the findings and hand over the final resettlement study to the government in September,” Koseya Wambaka, SFI’s head of operations, told Oil in Uganda. Read More

  • ‘Contract monitoring coalition’ kicks off with World Bank support

    After a year-long incubation process supported by the World Bank Institute, 19 Ugandan civil society organisations this week formally established a ‘contract monitoring coalition’ that aims to involve local communities in the oversight of government-funded projects—including those related to oil—awarded to private sector contractors. Read More

  • Educate yourselves, big business tells Ugandan media

    Key figures in Uganda’s business elite have accused the national media of ignorance about the oil industry.

    “We cannot afford to be addressed by ignorant writers. If you do not know anything about the oil sector, forgive Ugandans and just keep quiet,” Richard Kaijuka, Vice President of the Uganda Chamber of Mines and Petroleum, told a corporate gathering in Kampala last week. Read More

  • This is as close as one can approach Ondiek well without attracting the attention of security guards.  (NY)

    No reason to delay on transparency, says former UK aid minister

    Uganda should lose no time in signing up to the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI), which requires companies and governments publicly to disclose oil and mining payments and revenues, former UK Secretary of State for International Development, Clare Short, told a group of journalists and civil society organisation leaders in Kampala yesterday.

    “Nothing is stopping Uganda from acting now,” said Ms. Short, who has served as Chair of EITI’s Board of Directors since 2011. “You could start tomorrow.  It’s always good to start before oil starts flowing, because then you’ve got transparency from the start.” Read More

  • We are wasting time, says Tullow chief

    The Chairman of Tullow Oil’s Ugandan subsidiary has expressed disappointment at the slow progress towards oil production since the 2006 discoveries in the Albertine Graben.

    “In Ghana, it took them two years to commence production of their oil after it had been discovered. Kenya, after discovering oil this year, has asked Tullow [Kenya] to deliver the oil as fast as it was done in Ghana.  But in Uganda, we are still negotiating confidentiality issues, stabilisation clauses, etc,” said Elly Karuhanga. Read More

  • Bunyoro appeals for special treatment and share of oil revenue

    The Minister for Information in the Bunyoro-Kitara Kingdom has urged government to give special consideration to people in the oil producing areas as compensation for losses they may incur once oil production begins.

    “Our people are going to face the effects of environmental degradation, social and political problems. They deserve additional benefits over and above other Ugandans,” said Moses Kirungi.  “How can you hunt an animal on my land, slaughter it and take away all the meat without leaving some of the kill for the owner?” Read More

  • We are not spendthrifts, say oil companies

    The view held by some Ugandans that oil companies are on a spending spree because they stand to legally recover their expenses when they eventually commence oil production is misled, says Eoin Mekie, the General Manager of Tullow Oil in Uganda.

    While speaking to members of civil society at a meeting jointly hosted by Tullow, TOTAL and CNOOC, Mr. Mekie said that whereas the public believes that there is no incentive for the oil companies to be cost effective, it is in fact in the best interests of the oil companies to keep exploration costs low. Read More

  • Advocates fear “shrinking space” over land row–but grassroots groups say business as usual in oil regions

    A stand-off between central government and a policy advocacy group, the Uganda Land Alliance (ULA), has alarmed national level civil society organisations but seems not to have affected work by grassroots organisations in oil exploration areas.

    According to a public statement by the ULA, the Minister for Internal Affairs, Hillary Onek, has demanded that the Alliance withdraw a report on ‘land grabbing’ and apologise to the government for bringing Uganda into international disrepute. Onek, the Alliance says, has threatened the group with closure if they fail to meet these conditions. Read More

  • “How do we make money?” Banyoro ask oil info centre

    Amid the excitement and uncertainty surrounding Uganda’s impending oil production, the Kitara Heritage Development Agency (KHEDA) has set out to provide information on the latest developments to people in the oil-rich Bunyoro region. Oil in Uganda talked to Wilberforce Bigabwenkya, the Project Manager of the KHEDA Oil Information and Resource Centre, about the project. Read More

  • Image: Activists from Kibaale District wait to hear the court ruling

    Activists vow to continue battle for disclosure of oil agreements

    Activists from Kibaale District wait for the court ruling. (Andrew Kaahwe, quoted in article, third from left)

    Oil transparency activists were disappointed by a ruling against them yesterday in Nakawa High Court, Kampala, but have vowed to continue a legal battle to require the government of Uganda to publish Production Sharing Agreements (PSAs) that it has reached with international oil companies.

    Lady Justice Faith Mwhonda rejected an application from the African Institute for Energy Governance (AFIEGO) and three other civil society organisations for permission to present evidence at an appeal by two journalists against a separate ruling which denied them access to the PSAs. Read More