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Social impacts

  • Uganda flag

    Which way is oil power flowing?

    How is oil impacting on the distribution of political power in Uganda?  Is it empowering local government and communities, or concentrating more power at the centre?  We asked a range of Ugandan thinkers and public figures “What impact is oil having on political and economic relations between the Ugandan state and local administrations and people in oil-bearing areas?”  Below are their answers. More will be published next week.  Read More

  • Two men merry making in Kyapaloni town, Kabaale parish, Hoima. (Photo: Chris Opio)

    Refinery residents blow compensation on booze, motorcycles

    Two men merry making in Kyapaloni town, Kabaale parish, Hoima. (Photo: Chris Opio)

    A good number of the compensated refinery area residents are spending their money on luxuries, ignoring lessons from a crash course in financial management and investment that the government took them through last year to prepare them for the windfall. Read More

  • Women in Kyapaloni market which lies with the refinery area and will be re-located too

    Paid refinery area residents given three months to relocate

    Women in Kyapaloni market which lies within the 29 sq.km. the refinery area and will be re-located too

    Government commenced the compensation of the residents in the refinery area in Kabaale parish, Hoima district this week, and immediately gave them a three-month ultimatum to vacate the land upon compensation. Read More

  • Douglas Oluoch

    Nwoya man cursed by oil

    Douglas Oluoch (Photo: Emil H.)

    PURONGO SUB-COUNTY, NWOYA DISTRICT: What started as a company official taking advantage of a naive resident and duping him to accept his land to be used as a waste dumping site in exchange for a small fee, has developed into a complex social issue, leaving the victim isolated and scared for his life. Read More

  • Yoweri point to what is left

    “My cows were killed by oil waste”

    Yoweri stands in what is left of the ‘killer’ pit, pointing at the stagnant water that he claims killed his livestock ten years ago. The pit has filled up over the years but traces of a greenish liquid can still be seen(Photo: Emil H.) 

    RWEBISENGO SUB-COUNTY, NTOROKO DISTRICT:  This area is part of Exploration Area (EA) 3A in the Semliki Basin, which was first licensed to Heritage Oil and Gas Ltd. in 1997, and later re-licensed to the same company in 2002. Read More

  • Pincho

    “Total owes me a house”

    Richard Picho poses with his children in what is left of his house. After  waiting for over a year for Total to compensate him, he decided to take the house down a few weeks ago to salvage some of the materials which he will use to build a new house. (Photo: Emil H).

    ALUI SUB-COUNTY, NEBBI DISTRICT: A family whose houses developed cracks in the walls after Total passed through their land while collecting seismic data last year is calling on the oil company to compensate them for their loss. Read More

  • A street in Hoima Town

    Hoima town feels the strain of a high population

    New buildings are coming up in Hoima town, and so are new people from across the country.

    As more people flock to Hoima town in pursuit of oil opportunities, municipal officials are increasingly getting concerned about the town’s lack of capacity to handle the massive waste that comes  with a high population. Read More

  • Kanara town in Ntoroko District (Photo: Emil Hougaard)

    Ntoroko locals await oil news

    Kanara town in Ntoroko District (Photo: Emil Hougaard)

    More than one year after the Chinese National Offshore Oil Corporation (CNOOC) failed to find oil in its Kanywataba prospect, residents of Kanara and Rwebisengo sub-counties in Ntoroko district remain confused on the status of ‘their’ oil resources. Read More

  • Compensation of refinery residents commences

    Esther Igonja, of Congolese origin, has spent 50 of her 80 years in Kabaale Parish—but will now have to give way for the construction of the oil refinery. (Picture: FW)

    Implementation of the first phase of the Resettlement Action Plan (RAP) kicked off early this month and will end with the 7,118 residents of the thirteen Hoima villages on whose land the oil refinery will be built being compensated for their property, or relocated.

    The seventy billion shillings project (about 27 million dollars) is being implemented by Strategic Friends International, a local consultancy firm. Read More

  • Ugandan-shilling

    Oil money lures sex workers to Hoima

    Across the world, infrastructure projects that employ large numbers of men soon attract a camp following of sex workers.  It is now happening in Hoima.

    “I can’t leave with you now but I can come to your hotel in the morning and we spend the whole day together.”

    So says Sarah (not her real name) a ‘waitress’ in a down-town Hoima bar. She says she would get into big trouble if she left without the permission of her boss—an elderly lady who, according to staff and customers, is of Rwandese origin. All dealings with men have to be cleared by the boss. Read More